Sunday, March 10, 2013

Review 1: The Help (Kathryn Stockett)

 


 




THE HELP REVIEW
Synopsis
Be prepared to meet three unforgettable women:

Twenty-two-year-old Skeeter has just returned home after graduating from Ole Miss. She may have a degree, but it is 1962, Mississippi, and her mother will not be happy till Skeeter has a ring on her finger. Skeeter would normally find solace with her beloved maid Constantine, the woman who raised her, but Constantine has disappeared and no one will tell Skeeter where she has gone.

Aibileen is a black maid, a wise, regal woman raising her seventeenth white child. Something has shifted inside her after the loss of her own son, who died while his bosses looked the other way. She is devoted to the little girl she looks after, though she knows both their hearts may be broken.

Minny, Aibileen’s best friend, is short, fat, and perhaps the sassiest woman in Mississippi. She can cook like nobody’s business, but she can’t mind her tongue, so she’s lost yet another job. Minny finally finds a position working for someone too new to town to know her reputation. But her new boss has secrets of her own.

Seemingly as different from one another as can be, these women will nonetheless come together for a clandestine project that will put them all at risk. And why? Because they are suffocating within the lines that define their town and their times. And sometimes lines are made to be crossed.

In pitch-perfect voices, Kathryn Stockett creates three extraordinary women whose determination to start a movement of their own forever changes a town, and the way women — mothers, daughters, caregivers, friends — view one another. A deeply moving novel filled with poignancy, humor, and hope, The Help is a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don't.
Excerpt
Two days later, I sit in my parent’s kitchen, waiting for dusk to fall. I give in and light another cigarette even though last night the surgeon general came on the television set and shook his finger at everybody, trying to convince us that smoking will kill us. But Mother once told me tongue kissing would turn me blind and I’m starting to think it’s all just a big plot between the surgeon general and Mother to make sure no one ever has any fun.

At eight o’clock that same night, I’m stumbling down Aibileen’s street as discreetly as one can carrying a fifty-pound Corona typewriter. I knock softly, already dying for another cigarette to calm my nerves. Aibileen answers and I slip inside. She’s wearing the same green dress and stiff black shoes as last time.

I try to smile, like I’m confident it will work this time, despite the idea she explained over the phone. "Could we… sit in the kitchen this time?" I ask. "Would you mind?"

"Alright. Ain’t nothing to look at, but come on back."

The kitchen is about half the size of the living room and warmer. It smells like tea and lemons. The black-and-white linoleum floor has been scrubbed thin. There’s just enough counter for the china tea set.

I set the typewriter on a scratched red table under the window. Aibileen starts to pour the hot water into the teapot.

"Oh, none for me, thanks," I say and reach in my bag. "I brought us some Co-Colas if you want one." I’ve tried to come up with ways to make Aibileen more comfortable. Number One: Don’t make Aibileen feel like she has to serve me.

"Well, ain’t that nice. I usually don’t take my tea till later anyway." She brings over an opener and two glasses. I drink mine straight from the bottle and seeing this, she pushes the glasses aside, does the same.

I called Aibileen after Elizabeth gave me the note, and listened hopefully, as Aibileen told me her idea—for her to write her own words down and then show me what she’s written. I tried to act excited. But I know I’ll have to rewrite everything she’s written, wasting even more time. I thought it might make it easier if she could see it in type-face instead of me reading it and telling her it can’t work this way.

We smile at each other. I take a sip of my Coke, smooth my blouse. "So…" I say.

Aibileen has a wire-ringed notebook in front of her. "Want me to… just go head and read?"

"Sure," I say.

We both take deep breaths and she begins reading in a slow, steady voice.

"My first white baby to ever look after was named Alton Carrington Speers. It was 1924 and I’d just turned fifteen years old. Alton was a long, skinny baby with hair fine as silk on a corn…"

I begin typing as she reads, her words rhythmic, pronounced more clearly than her usual talk. "Every window in that filthy house was painted shut on the inside, even though the house was big with a wide green lawn. I knew the air was bad, felt sick myself…"

"Hang on," I say. I’ve typed wide greem. I blow on the typing fluid, retype it. "Okay, go ahead."

"When the mama died, six months later," she reads, "of the lung disease, they kept me on to raise Alton until they moved away to Memphis. I loved that baby and he loved me and that’s when I knew I was good at making children feel proud of themselves…"
I hadn’t wanted to insult Aibileen when she told me her idea. I tried to urge her out of it, over the phone. "Writing isn’t that easy. And you wouldn’t have time for this anyway, Aibileen, not with a full-time job."

"Can’t be much different than writing my prayers every night."

It was the first interesting thing she’d told me about herself since we’d started the project, so I’d grabbed the shopping pad in the pantry. "You don’t say your prayers, then?"

"I never told nobody that before. Not even Minny. Find I can get my point across a lot better writing em down."

"So this is what you do on the weekends?" I asked. "In your spare time?" I liked the idea of capturing her life outside of work, when she wasn’t under the eye of Elizabeth Leefolt.

"Oh no, I write a hour, sometimes two ever day. Lot a ailing, sick peoples in this town."

I was impressed. That was more than I wrote on some days. I told her we’d try it just to get the project going again.

Aibileen takes a breath, a swallow of Coke, and reads on.

She backtracks to her first job at thirteen, cleaning the Francis the First silver service at the governor’s mansion. She reads how on her first morning, she made a mistake on the chart where you filled in the number of pieces so they’d know you hadn’t stolen anything.

"I come home that morning, after I been fired, and stood outside my house with my new work shoes on. The shoes my mama paid a month’s worth a light bill for. I guess that’s when I understood what shame was and the color of it too. Shame ain’t black, like dirt, like I always thought it was. Shame be the color of a new white uniform your mother ironed all night to pay for, white without a smudge or a speck a work-dirt on it."

Aibileen looks up to see what I think. I stop typing. I’d expected the stories to be sweet, glossy. I realize I might be getting more than I’d bargained for. She reads on.

"…so I go on and get the chiffarobe straightened out and before I know it, that little white boy done cut his fingers clean off in that window fan I asked her to take out ten times. I never seen that much red come out a person and I grab the boy, I grab them four fingers. Tote him to the colored hospital cause I didn’t know where the white one was. But when I got there, a colored man stop me and say, Is this boy white?" The typewriter keys are clacking like hail on a roof. Aibileen is reading faster and I am ignoring my mistakes, stopping her only to put in another page. Every eight seconds, I fling the carriage aside.

"And I say, Yessuh, and he say, Is them his white fingers? And I say, Yessuh, and he say, We,ll you better tell em he your high yellow cause that colored doctor won’t operate on a white boy in a Negro hospital. And then a white policeman grab me and he say, Now you look a here—"

She stops. Looks up. The clacking ceases.

"What? The policeman said look a here what?"

"Well, that’s all I put down. Had to catch the bus for work this morning."

I hit the return and the typewriter dings. Aibileen and I look each other straight in the eye. I think this might actually work.
My Review
The Help is Kathryn Stockett's first novel, which is set in the early sixties in Jackson, Mississippi.
The Help touches on several topics, including racial segregation and civil rights and the relationship between Negro employees and their white employers. The dialogue is absolutely pitch perfect. There is both humor and heartache; cruelty and kindness to romance and suspense.
Although it may seem like it is "cliché" or "dull", it is not. The Help is truly a moving story, which opens the eyes of all ages, color, sex, etc. to what makes them unique.
As for the adaptation from book to movie is done rather well, but for the audience that has only seen the movie it is not as rewarding as reading a well written novel. The novel offers a much more understanding of each individual character, whereas the movie only allows the viewer to see each character's actions. If you haven't read The Help yet I would highly recommend doing so and if you choose to read the novel, read it slowly and take your time to truly understand what is being said and written. Every word counts.
You is Kind, You is Strong, You is Beautiful.
-Aibileen Clark, The Help




6 comments:

  1. Glad you joined the Author Author Blog Bounce! This is one of my favorite books and I agree with you that while the movie is excellent, the book is even better and deeper. I was horrified to learn more about the mistreatment of Black people as recently as the 1960's.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This book has been on my to-read list for so looong! Must bump it up higher. I totally get what you're saying about the movie---I'll be sure to read the book first.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I found your great blog through the WLC Blog Follows on the World Literary Cafe! Great to connect! Hope to see more from you :)

    -Meryl S. Fortney, the only transsexual indie author who writes space-opera fiction!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love The Help! Nice post! Found you through the WLC. Come say hello sometime at http://www.janmoran.com.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I found your great blog through the WLC Blog Follows on the World Literary Cafe! Great to connect!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great post! I found you through the WLC Blog Follows program, and it is really nice to meet you :)
    Please feel free to come say hi at http://jamesawest.blogspot.com
    Best wishes,
    James A. West

    ReplyDelete